Monday, 30 November 2015

Wild Geese

So this is my latest quilt which I sweated over solidly for the last week and a half, partly out of a mistaken conviction that Friday was 30th November  (the deadline for Quiltcon entry).  The quilt was made using all but a few scraps of the fabric I received for taking part in the Michael Miller Fabric Challenge (some for the geese and the rest for the scrappy binding), and I'm entering it in that category at Quiltcon.



The quilt is a play on the idea of the flying goose block.  I had in my mind one of the beautiful skeins of geese you see flying south across the winter sky.  The main difficulty, which only a quiltmaker would understand, was how to position the seams.   It looks simple, but the construction was complicated as none of the geese are in alignment with each other.

I emphasised the dual nature of the geese by leaving the blocks unquilted except round the triangles to hold them in place, which meant burying about 140 thread ends.    Because the geese don't line up I had to quilt it in several sections - there are only two places I could  sew right down from top to bottom.


The thing I am most proud of is persevering in the face of an ongoing conviction that it wasn't going to work out, especially when I realised that the back was going to show through to the front and I had to resort to using two layers of batting.  All the things I make go like that - I'm sure I'm not alone! Anyway, I'm currently high on quilt completion euphoria, but I don't want to look too carefully at the other #michaelmillerchallenge quilts on Instagram as they are really wonderful.




It's the first time I have ever entered anything I have made for show.   For anyone who doesn't know, it's juried entry; that is, your quilt is considered and might be rejected at the application stage, so I'm hoping for the best.    I will be a bit disappointed if it is not accepted, but on the other hand I have made a quilt I wanted to make and learned a lot in the process.

PS does anyone know what to do about a crinkly bottom? :-)











19 comments:

  1. I have no idea what to do about a crinkly bottom but I sure do love your quilt.

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  2. It's so pretty - so spare and with a good sense of movement. Congratulations on a beautiful finish and good luck in the contest!

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  3. So much wonderful work deserves to be recognised! Fingers crossed for you Catherine!

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  4. All the best for getting it accepted. That's a lot of threads to bury!

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  5. it's beautiful! Blocking might help with the crinkly part :-)

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  6. Great quilt! You need to block it in order for it to hang right. This is a good article on how to do it: http://www.kimmyquilt.com/article/blockingaquilt/

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  7. It's wonderful!

    P.S. I'd also recommend blocking!

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  8. Catherine this is simply beautiful! I know what you mean about the seams. I made an improv quilt once from different blocks and setting them for the top was (perhaps unnecessarily) complex- all the time I felt there must be an easier way that I was making it hard for myself somehow! I love the way you left the shadow geese unquilted! All in all stunning-all the best for acceptance.

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  9. I like the thought behind this one; it was worth persevering. Good luck!

    I don't know what to do about a crinkly bottom, but the question made me think of when my brother accidently walked in on our grandmother in the shower when he was a little boy - as he walked back out he said, "I don't know what you're wearing in there, Nan, but it sure needs ironing!"

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  10. I love it. Such an inspiration! Good luck! I hope you get in. :)

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  11. Fabulous finish Catherine, I shall keep my fingers crossed that it is accepted, it definitely deserves to be!

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  12. I like the way you think ! Bravo for doing it your way !
    This piece is stunning and so, so like a family of geese in flight !!!!!
    I hope there was good news re: the show !
    There is nothing wrong with your bottom (the quilt) !

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  13. I love how you sneak in subtle different layers of meaning in order to make the viewer think, like leaving the flying geese squares unquilted. I love that detail--it really sets this quilt apart from others. I can't believe how many threads you had to bury! Good for you for all that attention to the little things. Now come back and tell us if it was accepted--I'm really curious. (Crinkly bottom--sometimes it's how it's hung (dipping slightly on the outer upper corners) and sometimes it's to do with grain line of the fabric and/or the backing. Most all quilts I see experience this to some degree. I wouldn't worry about it.)

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  14. It looks beautiful, and so perfect for 'Wild Geese'. I'm slightly in awe of your care with quilting/burying threads, that's so much more thought and care than I ever manage!

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